No More RPG Adventure Ideas? We Have Somthing For You

After a character drinks moonpowder mixed with wine all is well – until the full moon, when she turns into an adorable little kit fox. Although she accidentally bites someone on the finger while in fox form (luckily not passing on the lycanthropy, though it will take a month before that is clear), no one seems very bothered by it. Unlike the full turn-out-the-neighborhood-with-torches-and-pitchforks reactions that werewolves elicit, everyone in the local village seems to think that having a werefox in their midst is just incredibly cute. This works well with a character who really wants everyone to take her seriously, although a player who can just roll with it works well, too. (moonpowder – small bag of powder that when mixed with wine and drunk permanently gives a person +2 intelligence, but makes him or her a werefox)

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A black leather collar studded with iron spikes that raises INT +3 while worn is the only really powerful intelligence raising magic available in the city of Fort Gray. It has a bit of an unsavory history, though: The previous owner was an apprentice wizard who snapped and killed his master, then was executed himself. And looking at the collar, anyone can see how wearing it could make you snap. If the character does buy the item, people will wolf whistle at him on the street, and no one will take him particularly seriously. But it is a really powerful item.

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A magic-using member of the group manages to luck onto a small glass jar of powdered fish bones that adds +3 INT while carried, but permanently reduces INT by 1-3 if the jar is broken, giving her a huge windfall of extra spell points, skill points, and a higher spell failure roll. As soon as she can’t live without it, send the group on a pell-mell chase, careening up and down cliffs and jagged hills and breakneck goat paths, risking the jar at every moment.

***

After winning a gold necklace in a drunken card game (randomly swaps the wearer’s sense with another person. The necklace works once a month, at a random time, but only works once for each person. At the end of the month, both people’s SEN reverts to normal), one of the characters finds his sense cut in half. He soon loses the necklace again, but becomes convinced that it holds the key to returning him to his former cleverness. (He’s wrong, but it makes sense, to his new way of thinking.) If he does succeed in getting it back, it should take a while to figure out that it won’t actually work, and in the meantime, it may swap the lowered SEN with another party member.

***

A peacock feather in a jaunty cap makes a colorful magic item, but now everyone is mistaking the character wearing it for a famous minstrel who affected that look when he passed through town years ago. (If he denies it, people won’t believe him, telling him the great minstrel said the same thing, and promised he’d come back.) He’s being offered drinks, lodging, everything a minstrel could want – but he also knows they’ll turn on him when they realize he’s not who they think. And they expect him to put on a life-changing concert in the town square that night. (The peacock feather raises sense +1 when worn in a hat)

***

The group acquires a magical horn that raises leadership after arriving from out of town, only to find out that it had been stolen from the popular First Magistrate of Hender – and suddenly one of the characters is speaking in the Magistrate’s very distinctive voice. The city guard is combing the streets, and no one will risk the Magistrate’s wrath by taking the horn off their hands. (The horn raises LEA +3 and gives whoever carries it a beautiful baritone voice.)

***

One of the characters is an animal trainer, who needs to raise his leadership in order to successfully train the elephants commissioned for the crown princess’s naming day party. Unfortunately, the only one available in his price range is a headdress made of eagle feathers that adds +3 to LEA while worn. The long, trailing eagle feathers of the headdress are an endless source of amusement to the elephants, but the bonus is, in fact a huge aid in training them. As the naming day approaches, the character realizes that a) the elephants can deliver everything he promised and more and b) they can only do it if he’s wearing the headdress. The naming day party is a very formal occasion (even if it does have elephants). Wearing a headdress of elephant-battered feathers would seem to be out of the question.…

***

One of the characters is offered a potion that permanently raises BEA +1 while lowering another random stat -1. The shopkeeper gives her the hard sell, playing on every stereotypical and manipulative argument of why she needs to be prettier in order to have a chance at happiness. Surely a lower intelligence or sense is a small price to pay for beauty.…

***

At a fine weapons shop, several of the characters try out a claymore, but it works better for some of them than others. An embarrassed shopkeeper tries to explain the reasons why to them without offending anyone by seeming to call them unattractive (claymore that’s +1/+10% for someone with a beauty of 19 or better, but is just +5% for anyone else). If played right, half the party will be baffled by the high asking price for the sword – and why their handsome companion likes it so much. What use is a sword whose bonuses seem to come and go?

***

After wearing a magical mask to a masked ball, a character catches the eye of the prince, who spends half the night dancing with her. By the end of the dance, the prince seems utterly captivated. Afterward they walk for hours under the moonlight. They find themselves on the walls of the city as the sun rises. Now, the prince tells her, it’s time to unmask.… (a mask that raises the wearer’s BEA to 24 while worn, but halves BEA for a day after it’s taken off)

***

After running afoul of a corrupt monk and his minions, the characters take away the torque that is his badge of office – only to fine that he’s much more attractive and less coldblooded without it. In fact, he seems like a nice guy. Is it all an act to get them to let down their guards, or was the torque responsible for his actions? (austere torque that adds +4 SEN but at the cost of -6 BEA while worn)

 

Adventure seeds above were written by an author of The Wildside Gaming System.

The Wildside Gaming System (wildsidegame.net) was first published as a book in 2004, by Wildside Press, LLC in Rockville, Maryland. An oldstyle gaming system with a focus on worldbuilding, it was followed by a number of tie-in books including The Wildside Book of Loot, Crusade of Kings, and Koboldly Where Gnome has Gone Before.

They are running their kickstarter campaign right now. To know more visist http://ancientscroll.pl/wildside-gaming-system-to-be-released-as-a-free-app/ or http://kck.st/22L1ld0

 

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